Hitting the Books: Is the hunt for technological supremacy harming our collective humanity?

Stand apart humanity, you are keeping up the progress. We’ve passed the stage of usefulness for Homo sapiens, now is the dawning of the Homo Faber era. The plan that “I feel hence I am” has develop into quaint in this new age of builders and creators. But has our continued obsession with technological know-how and progress really managed to as an alternative established again our capacity for humanity? 

In his new reserve, The Myth of Artificial Intelligence: Why Desktops Are unable to Imagine the Way We Do, author and pioneering researcher in the subject of normal language processing, Erik J Larson, investigates the endeavours to establish computer systems that course of action facts like we do and why we’re considerably farther absent from getting human-equal AIs than most futurists would care to admit.

Belknap Press

Excerpted from The Myth of Artificial Intelligence: Why Desktops Are unable to Imagine the Way We Do by Erik J Larson, revealed by The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press. Copyright © 2021 by Erik J. Larson. Employed by permission. All legal rights reserved.


Technoscience triumphed in the twentieth century but skeptical responses to it continued, as effectively. Hannah Arendt, the thinker manufactured famous by her phrase “the banality of evil,” in reference to the Nazi Nuremberg trials, argued that Comte’s technoscience — which, by the center of the twentieth century, certainly had not misplaced any steam as a philosophical plan — amounted to no fewer than a redefinition of human nature itself. Arendt

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